My Story & Why It Matters to You

In 2006, I entered Penn State, not know­ing much about col­lege or what I want­ed to do for the rest of my life. “Just work hard and get good grades,” they said. “Every­thing will take care of itself.” So that’s what I did. Ulti­mate­ly, I got exact­ly what I want­ed: in 2010, I grad­u­at­ed at the top of my class.

Since I did exact­ly what every­one said would work, I expect­ed employ­ers to bom­bard me with job offers. Who doesn’t want to hire the “smartest” guy in the class? Turns out, a lot of peo­ple. Despite my achieve­ments, by grad­u­a­tion I had zero job offers. Zero.

The fun­ny thing was, my fra­ter­ni­ty broth­er (one of the biggest slack­ers I knew) scored one of the best jobs pos­si­ble after grad­u­a­tion. I didn’t have a job, peri­od. This guy bare­ly went to class, hard­ly stud­ied, and played more FIFA (the video game) than any­one I had ever met. He did every­thing “wrong.” I did every­thing “right.” But he was the one with the dream job. Why?

I real­ized that the rules I was play­ing by were bro­ken. Every­one had told me (wrong­ly, as I dis­cov­ered too late) that just by work­ing hard and grad­u­at­ing col­lege, every­one gets a dream job. In real­i­ty, they don’t.

Today, no one talks about the con­se­quences of doing col­lege wrong. Here are some real-life sta­tis­tics that stu­dents will like­ly join if they car­ry out a bro­ken col­lege approach:

It doesn’t have to be this way. I learned too late. But you can learn now.

After spend­ing 7 years in col­lege (4 in under­grad and 3 in law school) I know how to play the game. I know what employ­ers want, where tuition is best spent, and how to pre­pare for exams.

That’s why I wrote HACK­iver­si­ty, a book that shows col­lege stu­dents what to do and how to do it. In essence, it’s a bat­tle-test­ed les­son book of every­thing I wish I would have known Day 1 of Fresh­man year. Know­ing these things would have changed my life. I’ve writ­ten it to change yours.

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